Many of the clients we work with have been thinking about a career change for some time before they come to see us. They have wanted to ‘make the jump’ for months, often years, but for some reason they just can’t seem to move forward.  One client described how he was feeling as follows:  “I just feel like I am frozen. I so desperately want to move but I just can’t seem to make it happen”.  Others have described what they are feeling in different ways, such as; ‘feeling paralysed’ or ‘being in a fog where I can’t find my way out”. 

Feelings of fear and self-doubt are common for career-changers and often that inner critic comes out on a regular basis. “I am too old to change careers’, “ I won’t earn enough money’, ‘I can’t afford to give up everything I have worked for’  – do any of these sound familiar?

Research on stressful life events has shown that changing jobs/careers ranks just below the death of a close relative. It is true that career change creates genuine fears that are real and justified.  Fear of failure, fear of losing status, fear of financial pressure are all real fears that link back to ensuring we can meet our most basic needs – food and shelter.   Who doesn’t want to be able to pay their mortgage/rent or be able to support their family?

The fight-or-flight response to stress has been studied since the 1920s, but a third possible reaction to threats – the “freeze response” – has recently received more attention. In our coaching, we often observe an underlying fear that leads to lacking motivation to do anything. As a result someone may feel paralysed or like they are unable to move forward. Neuroscience explains why this happens and reassures us that it does serve a purpose – most mammals naturally freeze for a few milliseconds to assess a situation before making their next move.

 The paralysis or fog often appears at peak times of uncertainty and moments of self-doubt. You may suddenly feel unsure about your purpose, career goals, values and inner motivations. Or you may feel uneasy about making decisions, such as where to go next and what to do. Clearing the fog may also be associated with accepting the concept that a change in career tends to bring about a shift in identity.

Here are some of our top tips to help you work through ‘the fog’:

  1. Accept your fear and see it as a friend

It is impossible to ignore your fear. Instead, accept it as a friend that serves a purpose.  Ask yourself: ‘What is the worst that could happen if things go wrong?’, ‘What am I actually afraid of?’ and ‘What can I do to reduce the risk of a worst-case scenario?”

In many cases, even the worst-case scenario is not all that bad. You may lose a bit of face but in many cases people can return to what they were doing previously if they really need to.

  1. Take the time to self-assess

The first step in both our Career Change Program and Relaunch Your Career Program is ‘self-assessment’. This means taking the time to really understand what you want out of your career and your life.  What are your strengths and weaknesses? What energises you? What environment motivates you? What are your values?

By truly understanding yourself, you begin to develop a set of criteria that allows you to test and measure your career ideas in the real world to see if they truly are the right fit for you. 

  1. Follow the ‘fairy lights’

As I have said in a previous post ‘No lightbulb moments’, career change is rarely a lightbulb moment. Instead you take small baby steps and follow the ‘fairy lights’ to lead you to your ideal career. By taking baby steps you are able to experiment and test your ideas whilst minimising the risk of making the wrong decision.  This reduces the fear and allows you to build confidence with your choices. 

  1. Shout it from the rooftops

The more people who know what you are trying to achieve the more support you can muster.  Tell your network what you are hoping to accomplish and don’t be afraid to ask for their help.  Most people love the chance to help people. 

Send an email out to your network asking for advice and to request introductions to people working in a particular field in order to organise an ‘informational interview’.  You will be amazed at how generous people can be with their time. 

  1. Recruit some cheerleaders

Career change is much easier with a support team.  Recruit a team of people around you who will support you when you face a setback and who will motivate you when you lose your mojo.  Enlist the support of others who have made a career change before you for additional support. 

  1. Have no regrets

Seth Godin said “ The only thing worse than starting something and failing….is not starting something”. Sometimes that inner voice telling you that something is not quite right should win out over the large voice of reason. If you will always regret not making a change then what have you got to lose. 

Follow the fairy lights and slowly you might just find your way out of the fog.

If you require further support with your career change, then contact Leah, Clare or Emily at enquiries@relaunchme.com.au to find out how we can provide you with further support to find
the work that you were meant to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling frustrated with your career change journey?  Have you tried to break into a new industry only to realise that you’re not gaining any traction? Are you applying for jobs on SEEK and not getting any responses? Are recruiters not giving you the time of day?

 

Unfortunately traditional job search tactics are far less effective for career changers and those relaunching their career after a long absence.   Responding to advertisements on job boards, and working with recruiters, tends to work best for traditional candidates who are already working in the same area in which the job has been advertised.

 

Therefore, if you are a ‘career changer’ or a ‘relauncher’ we always recommend using a more active job search method, rather than relying only on passive job search techniques.  

 

Active job search is all about untapping the hidden job market – the jobs that are not advertised. As you become more senior, the amount of active job search should increase each time you seek a new position. Someone at a manager level should be looking at splitting their job search into 75% active / 25% passive whilst someone at a CEO / Executive level should be increasing their active job search to closer to 100%.  Even graduates should be aiming to undertake a minimum of 25% active job search when seeking an entry-level position if they want to greatly increase their chances of securing employment. 

 

Does the hidden job market exist? 

 

Many of our clients ask us if the ‘hidden job market’ really exists.  The short answer is ‘yes’.  It is estimated that just 20-30% of available roles are actually advertised. The rest are found in the hidden job market. Typically, the more senior the role, the less chance it will be advertised.

 

These jobs are often filled before they are advertised, and more often than not as the result of networking.  The reasons for these un-advertised jobs vary greatly but may include; 

 

So what are active job search strategies? 

 

Active job search strategy basically means stepping away from the computer and setting up face-to-face connections where possible.  It requires a focused approach to find the next opportunity. It involves using and expanding your circle of connections to spread the word about what you are seeking and what you can offer. 

 

The three key steps 

 

There are three key steps to tapping into the hidden job market as follows: 

 

  • Map out your network
  • Develop and deliver your message
  • Follow up and organise informational interviews 

 

The best place to start is with your current network – school alumni, university alumni, friends, friends of friends, ex-colleagues, clients, ex-clients, internal colleagues, schoolyard friends, local business contacts etc. Think of whom you know and whom they know. 

 

Begin with the end in mind.  Identify the industries/companies that you think you would like to work for, and then work backwards to work out who in your network is connected to people in that industry/company that can set up an introduction for you.  

 

Next, get clear on your message: 

 

  • Who you would like to talk to and why
  • What information are you keen to find out
  • What industry sectors are you interested in
  • What organisations have you identified as companies that you would like to work for 

 

Then get in contact with your network and ask for their help.  An email such as the one below is the approach we recommend:

 

I’m currently considering a change in career/industry and was hoping to get your help. I want to use my marketing and communication skills but to change industry and work with a reputable company within the cosmetics/skincare industry. I’d ideally be looking for a job in the marketing / communications team in companies such as Sukin, Aesop, L’Oreal etc.  Please could you email me if you know of anyone in this industry that you could introduce me to”. 

 

Once you have communicated your message, then follow up and see if you can organise an informational interviewwith as many people as you can in your industry/ organisation of interest.  This will not only help you gather the information you need to make a career change but will also ensure that you are building connections in your industries of interest. 

 

Of course not everyone is going to have time to meet you for an informational interview.  Make it as easy as possible for people and be clear what you are wanting from them. Not many people these days have time to spend an hour with someone they don’t know unless it is mutually beneficial.  Start small by suggesting a 20-minute meeting in their lunch break or even a phone call to start with.

 

Other active job search strategies

 

Other active job search strategies might include direct applications to hiring managers / internal recruiters, networking through LinkedIn, attending industry Meetupsin your city or attending other professional networking groups such as BNI, Rotaryor Eventbriteindustry events. 

 

If you are feeling frustrated by your career change or job search, then have a go at commiting to some active job search over the next month and see if it makes a difference. We would be keen to hear how you get on! 

 

 

 

If you need some assistance with creating an active job search strategy, then contact Leah Lambart or Clare Pickard at enquiries@relaunchme.com.au to discuss how we may be able to help you tap into the hidden job market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An example ‘tell us about yourself’ using this response might look like the following:

“First of all, thanks for inviting me to interview today. I was delighted to have the opportunity to meet with you today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see from my resume, I have been working in Human Resources for six years, commencing my career with Company A as an HR Assistant before being promoted to the position of Human Resources Advisor after three years. In my current role as HR Advisor, I have had great exposure to broad HR areas including employee relations, industrial relations, grievances, change management as well as advising the business on relevant HR policy/practices and legislation. I was also instrumental in developing and implementing a new employee on-boarding process, which has had great feedback from new employees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My strengths are in my relationship-building and coaching skills and I have successfully managed stakeholders across three key areas of the business advising on key staffing issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am now looking to take on greater responsibility, to get involved in HR strategy and to lead a small team, which is why I have applied for the HR Manager role that you are advertising. I believe that my specific retail industry experience and my extensive knowledge of IR/ER will make me an ideal candidate for this role. I also believe that my values are aligned to your organisation as my personal values are integrity, teamwork and accountability which I have actively demonstrated in my current role”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you follow this simple structure and tailor your response around the specific needs of the company then you will create a professional impression from the very start of the interview.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We would love to know if you have found this article to be useful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further information on interview coaching or mock interviews, please contact us on enquiries@relaunchme.com.au or connect with us through our Facebook / Instagram account – @relaunchmecareerconsulting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many of the clients we work with have been thinking about a career change for some time before they come to see us. They have wanted to ‘make the jump’ for months, often years, but for some reason they just can’t seem to move forward.  One client described how he was feeling as follows:  “I just feel like I am frozen. I so desperately want to move but I just can’t seem to make it happen”.  Others have described what they are feeling in different ways, such as; ‘feeling paralysed’ or ‘being in a fog where I can’t find my way out”. 

Feelings of fear and self-doubt are common for career-changers and often that inner critic comes out on a regular basis. “I am too old to change careers’, “ I won’t earn enough money’, ‘I can’t afford to give up everything I have worked for’  – do any of these sound familiar?

Research on stressful life events has shown that changing jobs/careers ranks just below the death of a close relative. It is true that career change creates genuine fears that are real and justified.  Fear of failure, fear of losing status, fear of financial pressure are all real fears that link back to ensuring we can meet our most basic needs – food and shelter.   Who doesn’t want to be able to pay their mortgage/rent or be able to support their family?

The fight-or-flight response to stress has been studied since the 1920s, but a third possible reaction to threats – the “freeze response” – has received more attention in recent years. In our coaching, we often observe a fundamental fear that leads to lacking motivation to do anything. As a result someone may feel paralysed or like they are unable to move forward. Neuroscience explains why this happens and reassures us that it does serve a purpose – most mammals naturally freeze for a few milliseconds to assess a situation before making their next move.

The paralysis or fog often appears at peaks of uncertainty and moments of self-doubt. You may suddenly feel unsure about your purpose, career goals, values and inner motivations. Or you may feel uneasy about making decisions, such as where to go next and what to do. Clearing the fog may also be associated with accepting the concept that a change in career tends to bring about a shift in identity.

Here are some of our top tips to help you work through ‘the fog’:

  1. Accept your fear and see it as a friend

It is impossible to ignore your fear. Instead, accept it as a friend that serves a purpose.  Ask yourself: ‘What is the worst that could happen if things go wrong?’, ‘What am I actually afraid of?’ and ‘What can I do to reduce the risk of a worst-case scenario?”

In many cases, even the worst-case scenario is not all that bad. You may lose a bit of face but in many cases people can return to what they were doing previously if they really need to.

  1. Take the time to self-assess

The first step in both our Career Change Program and Relaunch Your Career Program is ‘self-assessment’. This means taking the time to really understand what you want out of your career and your life.  What are your strengths and weaknesses? What energises you? What environment motivates you? What are your values?

By truly understanding yourself, you begin to develop a set of criteria that allows you to test and measure your career ideas in the real world to see if they truly are the right fit for you. 

  1. Follow the ‘fairy lights’

As I have said in previous posts, career change is rarely a lightbulb moment. Instead you take small baby steps and follow the ‘fairy lights’ to lead you to your ideal career. By taking baby steps you are able to experiment and test your ideas whilst minimising the risk of making the wrong decision.  This reduces the fear and allows you to build confidence with your choices. 

  1. Shout it from the rooftops

The more people who know what you are trying to achieve the more support you can muster.  Tell your network what you are hoping to accomplish and don’t be afraid to ask for their help.  Most people love the chance to help people. 

Send an email out to your network asking for advice and to request introductions to people working in a particular field in order to organise an ‘informational interview’.  You will be amazed at how generous people can be with their time. 

  1. Recruit some cheerleaders

Career change is much easier with a support team.  Recruit a team of people around you who will support you when you face a setback and who will motivate you when you lose your mojo.  Enlist the support of others who have made a career change before you for additional support. 

  1. Have no regrets

 Seth Godin said “ The only thing worse than starting something and failing….is not starting something”. Sometimes that inner voice telling you that something is not quite right should win out over the large voice of reason. If you will always regret not making a change then what have you got to lose. 

Follow the fairy lights and slowly you might just find your way out of the fog.

If you require further support with your career change, then contact Leah, Clare or Emily at enquiries@relaunchme.com.auto find out how we can provide you with further support to find the work that you were meant to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling frustrated with your career change journey?  Have you tried to break into a new industry only to realise that you’re not gaining any traction? Are you applying for jobs on SEEK and not getting any responses? Are recruiters not giving you the time of day?

 

Unfortunately traditional job search tactics are far less effective for career changers and those relaunching their career after a long absence.   Responding to advertisements on job boards, and working with recruiters, tends to work best for traditional candidates who are already working in the same area in which the job has been advertised.

 

Therefore, if you are a ‘career changer’ or a ‘relauncher’ we always recommend using a more active job search method, rather than relying only on passive job search techniques.  

 

Active job search is all about untapping the hidden job market – the jobs that are not advertised. As you become more senior, the amount of active job search should increase each time you seek a new position. Someone at a manager level should be looking at splitting their job search into 75% active / 25% passive whilst someone at a CEO / Executive level should be increasing their active job search to closer to 100%.  Even graduates should be aiming to undertake a minimum of 25% active job search when seeking an entry-level position if they want to greatly increase their chances of securing employment. 

 

Does the hidden job market exist? 

 

Many of our clients ask us if the ‘hidden job market’ really exists.  The short answer is ‘yes’.  It is estimated that just 20-30% of available roles are actually advertised. The rest are found in the hidden job market. Typically, the more senior the role, the less chance it will be advertised.

 

These jobs are often filled before they are advertised, and more often than not as the result of networking.  The reasons for these un-advertised jobs vary greatly but may include; 

 

So what are active job search strategies? 

 

Active job search strategy basically means stepping away from the computer and setting up face-to-face connections where possible.  It requires a focused approach to find the next opportunity. It involves using and expanding your circle of connections to spread the word about what you are seeking and what you can offer. 

 

The three key steps 

 

There are three key steps to tapping into the hidden job market as follows: 

 

  • Map out your network
  • Develop and deliver your message
  • Follow up and organise informational interviews 

 

The best place to start is with your current network – school alumni, university alumni, friends, friends of friends, ex-colleagues, clients, ex-clients, internal colleagues, schoolyard friends, local business contacts etc. Think of whom you know and whom they know. 

 

Begin with the end in mind.  Identify the industries/companies that you think you would like to work for, and then work backwards to work out who in your network is connected to people in that industry/company that can set up an introduction for you.  

 

Next, get clear on your message: 

 

  • Who you would like to talk to and why
  • What information are you keen to find out
  • What industry sectors are you interested in
  • What organisations have you identified as companies that you would like to work for 

 

Then get in contact with your network and ask for their help.  An email such as the one below is the approach we recommend:

 

I’m currently considering a change in career/industry and was hoping to get your help. I want to use my marketing and communication skills but to change industry and work with a reputable company within the cosmetics/skincare industry. I’d ideally be looking for a job in the marketing / communications team in companies such as Sukin, Aesop, L’Oreal etc.  Please could you email me if you know of anyone in this industry that you could introduce me to”. 

 

Once you have communicated your message, then follow up and see if you can organise an informational interviewwith as many people as you can in your industry/ organisation of interest.  This will not only help you gather the information you need to make a career change but will also ensure that you are building connections in your industries of interest. 

 

Of course not everyone is going to have time to meet you for an informational interview.  Make it as easy as possible for people and be clear what you are wanting from them. Not many people these days have time to spend an hour with someone they don’t know unless it is mutually beneficial.  Start small by suggesting a 20-minute meeting in their lunch break or even a phone call to start with.

 

Other active job search strategies

 

Other active job search strategies might include direct applications to hiring managers / internal recruiters, networking through LinkedIn, attending industry Meetupsin your city or attending other professional networking groups such as BNI, Rotaryor Eventbriteindustry events. 

 

If you are feeling frustrated by your career change or job search, then have a go at commiting to some active job search over the next month and see if it makes a difference. We would be keen to hear how you get on! 

 

 

 

If you need some assistance with creating an active job search strategy, then contact Leah Lambart or Clare Pickard at enquiries@relaunchme.com.au to discuss how we may be able to help you tap into the hidden job market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An example ‘tell us about yourself’ using this response might look like the following:

“First of all, thanks for inviting me to interview today. I was delighted to have the opportunity to meet with you today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see from my resume, I have been working in Human Resources for six years, commencing my career with Company A as an HR Assistant before being promoted to the position of Human Resources Advisor after three years. In my current role as HR Advisor, I have had great exposure to broad HR areas including employee relations, industrial relations, grievances, change management as well as advising the business on relevant HR policy/practices and legislation. I was also instrumental in developing and implementing a new employee on-boarding process, which has had great feedback from new employees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My strengths are in my relationship-building and coaching skills and I have successfully managed stakeholders across three key areas of the business advising on key staffing issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am now looking to take on greater responsibility, to get involved in HR strategy and to lead a small team, which is why I have applied for the HR Manager role that you are advertising. I believe that my specific retail industry experience and my extensive knowledge of IR/ER will make me an ideal candidate for this role. I also believe that my values are aligned to your organisation as my personal values are integrity, teamwork and accountability which I have actively demonstrated in my current role”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you follow this simple structure and tailor your response around the specific needs of the company then you will create a professional impression from the very start of the interview.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We would love to know if you have found this article to be useful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further information on interview coaching or mock interviews, please contact us on enquiries@relaunchme.com.au or connect with us through our Facebook / Instagram account – @relaunchmecareerconsulting.